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dc.contributor.authorNongbri, Brent
dc.date.accessioned2023-02-24T14:24:19Z
dc.date.available2023-02-24T14:24:19Z
dc.date.created2022-02-24T18:33:45Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.citationHarvard Theological Review. 2022, 115 (1), 1-22.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0017-8160
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11250/3053981
dc.description.abstractSeven animal hide scrolls with Hebrew and Aramaic writing were sold in Jerusalem in 1947. Additional smaller fragments of similar scrolls were sold from 1948 to 1950. Within a few years of their appearance, these “Jerusalem Scrolls” as they were then known, became “the Dead Sea Scrolls from Qumran Cave 1.” While this change of names may seem trivial, it glosses over some difficult questions about the provenance of these materials. What we now call “Cave 1Q” or “Qumran Cave 1” was excavated in 1949, but scholarship reveals considerable confusion concerning which purchased scrolls can be materially connected to fragments that were excavated by archaeologists under controlled conditions in Cave 1. Furthermore, Cave 1 is often treated as if it was a sealed context rather than the highly contaminated site that it actually was at the time of its excavation by archaeologists. For these reasons, it is not completely clear whether all the scrolls usually assigned to Cave 1 actually originated at this site. This article is an attempt to sort through the evidence to determine exactly which scrolls and fragments attributed to Cave 1 were purchased, when and from whom such pieces were purchased, and what can actually be known with confidence about the connection of these “Jerusalem Scrolls” with the site we now call Qumran Cave 1.en_US
dc.description.abstractHow the “Jerusalem Scrolls” Became the Dead Sea Scrolls from Qumran Cave 1: Archaeology, the Antiquities Market, and the Spaces In Betweenen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internasjonal*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/deed.no*
dc.subjectAntikvitetshandelen_US
dc.subjectDødehavsrulleneen_US
dc.titleHow the “Jerusalem Scrolls” Became the Dead Sea Scrolls from Qumran Cave 1: Archaeology, the Antiquities Market, and the Spaces In Betweenen_US
dc.title.alternativeHow the “Jerusalem Scrolls” Became the Dead Sea Scrolls from Qumran Cave 1: Archaeology, the Antiquities Market, and the Spaces In Betweenen_US
dc.typePeer revieweden_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.description.versionpublishedVersionen_US
dc.subject.nsiVDP::Religionsvitenskap, religionshistorie: 153en_US
dc.subject.nsiVDP::Religious studies, history of religion: 153en_US
dc.subject.nsiVDP::Religionsvitenskap, religionshistorie: 153en_US
dc.subject.nsiVDP::Religious studies, history of religion: 153en_US
dc.source.pagenumber1-22en_US
dc.source.volume115en_US
dc.source.journalHarvard Theological Reviewen_US
dc.source.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0017816022000037
dc.identifier.cristin2005316
dc.relation.projectNorges forskningsråd: 275293en_US
cristin.ispublishedtrue
cristin.fulltextoriginal
cristin.qualitycode2


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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internasjonal
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internasjonal